Piecing the Pieces Together

I can be a bit black and white about my process—I either paint on paper or I paint on wood panels. But once in a while a switch gets flipped, and I see other ways to go about the business of making art.


In this case, I painted on paper, and instead of matting it and framing it, I decided to affix it to a panel. I know, lots of people have been doing this for a long time, but in addition to being black and white, I am sometimes also a bit slow to join in all the fun.


Here is step one in the affixing process. I gessoed and taped wood panels to fit the paintings—all are 6" x 6".

Step two is to apply adhesive to the panel. I like to use this ph neutral stuff. It works very well. I squeeze it on and apply it with a silicone squeegee.

After fitting the painting on the glued-up panel just so, keeping an eye on the corners so there isn't any slipping around, I carefully place a piece of glassine paper over the painting and as carefully press down with my hands to allow excess glue to exit over the sides. Then, I start to add books for weight. I add one and check the corners and edges of the painting one more time, and then I add a couple more.

Cold wax and oil fans—extra points for you if you can name the title of the larger book at the bottom of the stack. These points have no value.


I let this all rest in place for about 24 hours, careful not to bump anything. Then I remove the books and the glassine and confirm I glued my painting in place properly. Time to untape the panel and sand the edges a little and then frame the piece.


If you prefer to finish the sides of the panel with stain or paint, that's great, but I'm in a framing state of mind these days. And I use Ampersand floater frames almost exclusively. I don't get paid to say that, and I don't represent Jerry's Artarama, but here is where I get these frames—lately, as with many things, stock is iffy.


This is how it looks when I'm finished, complete with wire on the back and ready to hang.


There is something about painting on paper (Arches oil paper, specifically) that I find appealing. It absorbs well and holds cold wax medium well and takes to marks well. So, project successful, I say. I am currently working on a series of six of these little gems. You can see a few here, here, and here.

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